PORTFOLIO 2 - a New Facade/a New Image

Requirements

This project is the smallest fragment I designed, but incorporates aspects of all design problems I've encountered. The given context was a visually chaotic small scale "ranch-style" house whose front comprised a three-window living room marked by a visually weak gable roof and append­aged on either side by an inadequate entry and an ill-proportioned screen porch, whose roof leaked.             ·

The site context located the project at the conjunction of two streets oriented in different grids, such that the primary view was to a small park-like median resulting from their intersection. The owners wanted to reorganize an entry sequence, recognizing both pedestrian approach from the street and vehicular entrance from the adjacent drive. They also wanted to make use of the living room and upgrading the visual image of the house. A major constraint on any intervention was that no interior space could extend forward of the face of the existing living room, although the local Code permitted an unenclosed addition.

Solution

The resolution of all these conditions consisted of a layered zone of exterior and interior elements, activating the entire front area of the house. A regular geometry was superimposed across the facade and a progression of spatial gridding establishes the density of this zone, integrating new and existing spaces as one continuous fabric.  The variation in the formal treatment of the entry elaborates this singular element by a rich texture of space, light, and color through minor moves away from the regularity of the basic geometry. In addition to its solution of formal problems, the intervention evokes a sense of outdoor living appropriate to the specific context, climate and culture of having a "neighborly" front porch under the Loggia trellis.

DAVIS Site Plan
DAVIS Site Plan
Plans - Before + After
Plans - Before + After

The new Entry provided a 'threshold' that hadn't existed. The screen porch was replaced by an enclosed "Sun Room". A Loggia was built as a new "layer" between the house and front lawn.

Sheet 1-Construction Drawing
Sheet 1-Construction Drawing

The entire job was described in 2 sheets, 18"x24", this sheet had Location Plan, Foundation + upper Entry vault + trellis, Plan(s), foundation details

Sections + Elevations
Sections + Elevations

ABOVE: Sections BELOW: Elevations A 'butterfly" roof(s) were designed to drain to outer corners; a wall plane meant to screen the existing, its parapet marked by a 'stripe'.

Sheet 2 Construction Drawing
Sheet 2 Construction Drawing

Elevations + Sections, minimal critical Details, such as the roof drains, the double-bay of the Entry being a truss.

Plan - Analysis
Plan - Analysis

Regulating Lines and Square modular units.

Axonometric of Addition
Axonometric of Addition

The "intervention" was essentially 2 parts: - an Interior 'bookending' the existing center Living Room - the Exterior 'layered' in front, using the allowable non-enclosed space.

Exterior - overall view from SW
Exterior - overall view from SW

A "false front" meant to screen the existing, and by means of a 'butterfly' roof applied to the face of the existing base of the roof gable, provide the draining away of rainwater to either side.

Exterior - night
Exterior - night

One client wish was to provide a 'niche' for an elf figure she had brought from her previous home. A single bank of lights along the continuous interior furr-down soffit allowed the owners' home to appear occupied.

Exterior- day
Exterior- day

Any reference to The Alamo is . . .purely coincidental. The "missing bay" was to personalize the Entry as 'unique'.

Exterior - auto side entry
Exterior - auto side entry

"Framing" the vehicular drop-off with paired columns was achieved with 'notching' the corner, as seen in the plan.

Exterior - Trellis Loggia
Exterior - Trellis Loggia

The loggia was in fact an outdoor room.

Interior - View to new Sun Room
Interior - View to new Sun Room

An existing space (foreground) and the new room replacing a screen porch. The saltillo Mexican tiles level the floor to that of the existing wood floor

Interior view from Sun Room to Entry
Interior view from Sun Room to Entry

The continuous furr-down soffit provides a visual link between spaces; the new Entry centerline is clearly evident.

Interior - New Entry
Interior - New Entry

The 'rotated' closet defines the centerline of the space, the height results from the pitch of the roof, as well as providing natural light from a window above. Since the space could not be air-conditioned, and due to the adjacent neighbor, the glass block wall solved both issues.

Centered columns + framed view
Centered columns + framed view

The client removed existing shutters because: the column spacing pulled in from the actual window opening (plus one dead-center) provided a sense of enclosure and the trellis cut down on heat load.

Exterior Terrace
Exterior Terrace

Terrace adjacent to the new Room, outdoor furniture chosen by Client (who thought I might not like them . . .before I told her what the colors would be).

10 Years of Emerging Voices
10 Years of Emerging Voices

Selected to speak at The Architectural League of New York.

'CLICK' on images for Caption and to review in Sequence.